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Bhutan

A Note on Solo Traveler Fees

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We know solo traveler fees are a bummer and trust us, we don't like charging them either. We require the extra fee because it's the best possible way to provide a fair price to all clients. The solo traveler fee covers the increased cost of hotel stay (single vs. double rooms), ground transportation, and the additional guides, porters or cooks needed while on the trail.

The good news? The solo room fee guarantees your very own single/private room while in your host city.

The other good news? We offer a "match pool" so clients have the opportunity to connect and match with other solo travelers of the same gender. Let us know if you're interested and we'll be sure to make the introduction if there's another solo traveler looking to be matched! Simply email go@oneseedexpeditions.com and we'll take it from there. If there isn't a match, you'll receive an invoice with your single supplement fee 60 days prior to your expedition. 

You can find your specific single supplement fee by visiting your expedition page on our website.

Training for Your Trek: Quick Tips to Get Ready for the Trail

A frequently asked question here at OneSeed is usually along the lines of, "I'm hiking how much?? How do I train for this??" On a OneSeed trek, you'll be pushing your body to the limit as you hike through some of the most awe-inspiring places in the world. We've included some tips below on how to train for what will be an adventure of a lifetime!

Apparel and Footwear: Before you start training, invest in a solid pair of hiking boots and gym shoes. If your feet are tired and blistered, it will affect the rest of your body and increase the risk for injury. Make it a priority to break in your boots - wear them while you work out or even just walking around the neighborhood!

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Sweat!: You want to feel confident going into your expedition so start elevating your heart rate and building muscle! Find a work out routine that works for YOU and stick with it. If you don't like running, don't run, BUT find an activity that makes you sweat and tone. Hiking, running, biking and swimming are all great cardio-boosters but try interval training with activities like yoga and weight-lifting classes as well. Be sure you incorporate squats and lunges into your workouts so you build your leg muscles for the long hikes you'll be accomplishing on the trail. Lastly, don't forget to Stretch! Yoga and pilates classes are the best way to stretch out sore muscles and prevent injuries. 

Hydrate and Fuel: With all of this training, you'll be burning tons of calories! Be sure you're fueling your body with foods that help it perform at it's best and keep you feeling good. Incorporate healthy grains like quinoa, brown rice and wild rice, nuts like almonds and walnuts, fish, lean meats, fruits and vegetables into your diet on a daily basis. And don't forget about water! When you're dehydrated, you feel more fatigued than you actually are, making it easier to trip on the trail and cause injuries. Make it a goal to drink at least 64 oz. of water each day (that's two Nalgenes!) and start each meal with a glass of water.

Get High: Gearing up for a trip above 10,000ft? The higher up in elevation you can train, the better. If you live close to the mountains, push yourself on some high-elevation hikes and train your lungs to adjust to the lack of oxygen. If you don't live in an area where high-altitude trails are available, not to fear! All of our treks factor in rest days in order to acclimate to higher elevation. If you're feeling fatigued on the trail, go slow and take frequent breaks as your body adjusts to the altitude.

See you on the trail!

 

 

Quick Tips for Eating on the Trail

When trekking in a remote area, there are certain expectations that will help you make the most of the meals on the trail. Here’s a quick list of things to know about trail food to help you prepare for your expedition.

1) Carbs, Carbs, Carbs. In most of the areas where we travel, the diet is rich in carbs. When you spend 3-10 hours a day hiking, you need carbs for energy, so embrace it! Nepal is known for its dal bhat, Peru for its 3,800 types of potatoes, and Chile is the second largest bread consumer per capita in the world. But guess what? They all make really delicious carbs, so dig in!

2) Eat like a local. They best way to order off the menu in a foreign country is to mimic what the locals are doing. If you’re staying at a teahouse in the Langtang region, ordering a pizza might not be the best option. Pizza with yak cheese isn’t going to taste like is does from your local pizza shop in NYC. Look around you to learn about the delicious local dishes and try sticking to them. It’s a great way to fully immerse yourself in the country in which you’re traveling. What if you’re craving some comforting American food? It will be there for you to eat the day you get back!

3) Bring reserves. While trekking on OneSeed trips, you’ll be fed three large meals a day but some trekkers like to have power bars or granola bars to munch on while hiking. You can always bring a few just in case you need some extra fuel. (*Note: Customs rarely lets you bring nuts, seeds, or fruit into a foreign country)

4) Be adventurous. Some of the countries where we travel have exotic local dishes that you don’t find everywhere. Push your tastebuds to the limit with new flavors. Try the tongue in Chile or the spicy pickle in Nepal because you never know what you might like.

Food is an essential part of any culture. Be prepared to try new things and expand your tastebuds’ comfort zone. Bon Appétit!

7 Tips to Prepare for Your Trek

Always be prepared! The scout’s motto is simple, but true. Being well prepared for your trek will make your time much more enjoyable, and you can focus on the wonders around you rather than your blistered feet! Here are a few tips to help you prepare for your trek.

1.  Buy appropriate footwear and break your boots in.

  • Visit an outdoor retailer and do research to buy the appropriate pair of hiking boots for your feet.
  • Break them in! Showing up with brand new boots for a multi-day trek is an invitation for blisters and pain. Walk the dog in your boots, do yard work in your boots, take them hiking! You want your boots to feel nice and comfy when you arrive.
  • Buy good quality socks (non-cotton, moisture wicking socks such as Smartwool, Thorlos, Darn Tough, Woolrich etc…)
  • Remember: Your feet are your best friend. Happy feet, happy camper!

2.  Get out hiking. Regularly!

  • Start slowly and build your intensity, difficulty, and length of hikes. It is much better to start slowly and increase the difficulty gradually over several months than to wait to the last few weeks.
  • Wear what you will be wearing on the trail, especially if they are new items, so you know how they feel and can adjust anything that is irritating or doesn’t work. This includes your boots and the pack you will be carrying on the trail.
  • Go with a partner or a group. You won’t be able to cheat and going with someone else provides motivation and fun!
  • Cross train too (Bike, swim, run, yoga, stairs, etc). Different types of exercise work different muscle groups and will help condition your body. Strengthening your body can help prevent injuries on the trail.

3.  Learn about the OneSeed Fund

  • 10% of the revenue from your expedition will be loaned to local entrepreneurs via the OneSeed Fund.
  • The loans are extended by our partner microfinance institutions across many different industries such as agriculture, retail, food services and more.
  • Want to learn more about microfinance? Click here.

4.  Don’t bank on your bank.

  • Call your bank ahead of time to let them know about your travel plans.
  • Sometimes, when banks see a charge in a foreign country, they assume it was theft and freeze your account.
  • While you’re on the phone with your bank, ask them about international ATM fees.
  • Be sure to have back-up alternatives such as cash, traveler’s check, and credit cards.
  • Having copies of credit cards and passport information is a great safety net.

5.  Health, safety, and more.

  • Visit the CDC website or contact a local travel medicine office with any questions about immunizations or vaccines.
  • If you have any concerns about your health, contact your physician before you start a training program.
  • Learn more about tips to keep your belongings safe while traveling here.

6.  Insure Your Trip.

  • All OneSeed trips include medical and evacuation insurance for all travelers. This covers you from the moment your expedition begins.
  • We also strongly urge you to purchase the optional cancellation and interruption insurance. This third party insurance covers any injuries, illnesses, or other unforeseeable events between now and your expedition.
  • You never know what life has in store so it is better to prepare ahead of time!

7.  Pack light and early.

  •  Take a look at our packing list now and start to get an idea of what gear you have and what you will need to purchase. Waiting until the last minute is a recipe for disaster!
  • Outdoor gear can be quite expensive. Don’t forget that you can borrow from a friend, rent from various outdoor stores, or look online for items on sale.
  • That being said, don’t skimp! Making sure your clothes are built to last is important as you will be hiking outside in the elements for many days on end.
  • To lighten your load, bring travel-sized toiletries.
  • Ziplock bags make for inexpensive, weightless, water-resistant organizers for loose items.
  • Don’t forget to bring an extra outfit for the city. You can leave any extra gear at our partner lodge before the trek.

Happy trekking!